Local Placenames Project

Streets

Townlands

{short description of image}This project was begun by Trevor Barrett and will be built on . If you have any interesting facts or relevant information on any area of the project we would be glad to include them.
homepage



Streets

Ashe St. Princes St. / Staughton's Row / Day Place
Ballymullen Rock St.
Boherbee Strand St.
Bridge St. The Square
Caherslee Sullivan's Lane
Castle St. Walpole Lane
Denny St. Railway Station
Edward St.
The Green
Green Lane
The Mall
Monavalley
Moyderwell
Oak Park
Pembroke St.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Ashe St.


Ashe St. which has existed since the 1600s was just a row of houses along the banks of the River Gabhail, now called the Big River. The street owes its existenceto the river which still runs beneath. At the bottom of Ashe St. the river runs down Denny St. and then into Tralee Bay. Ashe St. until recent times was a mix of commercial and residential buildings. The stree gets its name from the patriot, Thomas Ashe who died on hunger strike in 1917 and was a native of Kerry. the street was called Nelson St. during British occupation.
It is said that the street was names after John Nelson, a Cromwellian commander who was given the task of subjugating Kerry for the British in the mid 1600s. As a reward Nelson was given the title Governor of Kerry. The courthouse which is probably the most impressive building in Tralee is situated on the site of of the old town jail which itself replaced a previous one which was located in The Square.
A man was hanged in the jail in 1777 for stealing a hat and wig valued of 16 shillings. The last hanging took place here in 1809 when 9 land agititators known as whiteboys were executed. The nine skeletons were found in a mass grave in 1831 while digging the foundation for the present courthouse. Todays courthouse with its Ionic facade was completed in 1835 of local limestone at a cost of £14,000 . The two Russian cannons which top columns at each side of the courthouse bears the names of Kerrymen who died in service with the British Army.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Bridge St.


Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Castle St.


What is now The Mall was probably the original market-place where merchants and traders sold or exchanged their wares in the open air. In the 1700s the Big River was diverted from Denny St. to flow down The Mall. The Mall stretches from Milk-market Lane to the corner of Ashe St. The most impressive feature is the Phoenix Building which housed Revington's Drapery, built in 1857. Many organisations had offices in The Mall :- Tralee Chamber of Commerce(1871), The Gaelic League(1896) and John Mitchells club(1902). The Munster Warehouse was a very old drapers run by John Mulchinock (uncle of William Mulchinock who wrote The Rose of Tralee).Mc.Cowens had a general store in The Mall for over 100 years. Mc.Donnell's Butchers have been in business since the 1850s. Hilser's Clock
Hilsers Jewellers were long-time residents of Castle Street. Hilser's clock is one of the most famous landmarks in Tralee. The clock which was purchased in England, is hollow with all its workings being located within the building. The clock was partially destroyed in 1921 by the Black and Tans.

St.John's Church dominates not just Castle St. but the whole town. Not only is it the most dominant feature in Tralee skyline but it is reputed to have the highest spire in Ireland.The present St.John's was built between 1854 and 1870 but it also incorporates an earlier east-west alignrd church which was built in 1780. Built of local sandstone and limestone it is unplastered inside and outside. Its most striking internal features are some 13th or 14th century carved stone figures and Stations of the Cross painted by Sean Keating.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Denny St.


John Fitzthomas Fitzgerald built the Great Castle at the junction of the present-day Castle St. and Denny St. The castle was surrounded by a moat. It was the chief stronghold of the Fitzgeralds of Desmond. Later Queen Elizabeth first left the castle to to the Denny family. It was burned three times between 1588 and 1690. In the 1820s the Dennys left town to live in England and the castle was demolished, being replaced in 1826 by the impressive new thoroughfare of Denny St. The stones from the castle were used in the building of 34 graceful houses erected on both sides of the new street.
The cedar doors from the castle were cut down to size and fitted in the two end houses, no. 17 and 18.
The Ashe Memorial Hall was built of local sandstone and was completed in 1928. It was named after Thomas Ashe who fought for Ireland's independence.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Edward St.


Edward St. is probably called after Sir Edward Denny. It is situated opposite St.John's Church. An old primary school run by the Christian Brothers once stood where the E.S.B. offices are today.It also has the G.P.O.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

The Square


The Square is first mentioned in recordsback in 1613. The forked river branched off at Mc.Donnell's butchers. The area was low lying and a marsh developed. turf was once harvested there. The houses were built on higher ground giving The Square its present shape. It later became a market place and cattle fairs were held there. There was also a thriving fish market.

McDONNELL'S
VICTUALLERS
The Square (066) 21235
The Oldest and Most Renowned Butcher Shop in Tralee
Established in the Square since the 1850's
For Traditional Quality at better than Supermarket prices

Shop at
McDONNELL'S

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Rock St.

Rock St. is said to have got its name from a rock of limestone which was broken up long ago for road construction. This street, until the last century was the main northern entry to the town and grew from an ancient winding path down from the hills. St.John's Park is now situated on the medieval Hospital site of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Princes St./ Staughtons Row / Day Place

Princes St. was known as Princes Quay as the Big river flowed through it.The river was used at high tide to bring small boats up to the Dominican Abbey which stood where the Abbey Car Park is today.The Dominicans were originally situated at Abbey St. until the last prior, Thaddeus Moriarty was arrested and hung in Killarney in 1653 by Cromwell's soldiers. In 1864 the Dominicans moved to to their present site. They had a school at No.1 Day Place from 1862 to 1910, called the Jeffers Institute.
Day Place was built in 1805 by Judge Robert Day. The residents had direct access to the river through a gateway in the railings...this is still to be seen today.Ozanam house was the home of Fr. Paul O'Sullivan who established a men's club called "The Tralee Catholic Library Society (T.C.L.S.), also still to be seen today.
Staughton's Row got its name from a family who were large landlords in North Kerry

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Pembroke St.

Pembroke St. is the main entrance to Tralee from Ardfert , Banna and Ballyheigue. The original entrance was probably a track along the banks of the Balloonagh River, which still flows under the houses to the north of the street, it then joins the Big River at the Island of Geese. The street gets its name from the Pembroke / Mulchinock family who will be remembered for their support of public education and welfare in Tralee. In 1859 they gave 6 acres to the Christian Brothers at Balloonagh to build a school, in 1870 the Brothers converted this to St. Joseph's Industrial School, which remained open until 1969. Probably the first major development in Pembroke St. was the building of a hospital / workhouse on the site which extends from McEllistrim's houseto the laneway at the gable of O'Keeffe's Furniture. The hospital closed in the late 1800s and was unused for a time until it was converted to an Agricultural Co-op. Use was made of the Balloonagh River which ran uncovered through the yard until recent times for cooling metals and soaking newly rimmed wooden wheels.
In 1900 the nearby O'Keeffe's Furniture had the telephone number of Tralee 1. Tralee's early telephone exchange was located at No. 26





O'Keeffe's Furniture


Tel. Tralee 1

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

The Mall

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Strand St.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Boherbee

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Ballymullen

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Green Lane

Presentation Convent which was founded in 1812 as a small community of nuns has as a result of many extensions grown to be one of the largest schools in Tralee. The laneway from Castle St. to Presentation Convent is called Green Lane.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Caherslee

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Sullivan's Lane

Sullivan's Lane which is situated between The Slievemish Pub and O'Carroll's Fruit and Veg. had two very well known pubs, "Crash Moloneys" and Fanny Dempseys.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Walpole Lane

The laneway which runs up by the gable of Masons pub gets its name from The Walpole Hotel which was situated there. Previous to that it was called Francis St. and had Mullins Bros. stables at the top left hand side.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Oak Park

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Monavalley

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Moyderwell

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

The Green

Around 1890 Sir Robert Arthur Denny sold the Castle Demesne to Dr. Clements Finnerty. Tralee U.D.C. bought it from the Finnerty family in 1922. It is noe the public park called The Green.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage

Railway Station

.The railway line was extended to Tralee in 1859.

Streets
Townlands
Project
Homepage


homepage

townlands


Townlands


homepage

townlands